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About the Arkansas Education Law Blog

Public education is a vast and ever-changing issue of national concern. Our goal is for every child to graduate from high school with the skills and abilities necessary to go to college and succeed in a 21st century career, and until we reach this goal, public education reform will continue to be at the forefront of every major discussion among policymakers at both the national and local levels.

In addition to the increasing advocacy for national and local education reforms through both legislation and regulation, our judicial system is becoming increasingly involved in shaping the education of our children. Both federal and state courts nationwide are continuing to hand down decisions, often with significant repercussions, that affect everything from school finance to student discipline to the First Amendment rights of students and teachers.

Because of the rapidly changing environment in public education today, I’ve created this blog as a resource for schools, educators, policymakers, parents, and the public in general, both throughout the state of Arkansas and nationwide. My goal is to keep you up to date on the latest court decisions, legislation, regulations, and policy decisions that affect both public and private education, and to analyze those decisions so that you can stay informed and understand how those decisions and policies affect your schools, teachers, and students.

About the Author

Jennifer Williams Flinn is an attorney with the Taylor & Taylor Law Firm, P.A., and currently serves as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Bowen School of Law where she teaches an Education Law course.

Jennifer has significant experience dealing with both legal and policy issues affected public education. Prior to entering private practice, Jennifer served as a policy advisor to Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe specializing in, among other things, education issues. Before serving in Governor Beebe’s administration, Jennifer worked as an attorney in the Arkansas Department of Education’s General Counsel’s office, and immediately upon graduating from law school, served as a judicial law clerk to Arkansas Supreme Court Justice Robert L. Brown.

 

 

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